Today, the Grey Creek Pass route is part of the Trans Canada Trail but it is not a highway. Trans Canada Trail file.

Today, the Grey Creek Pass route is part of the Trans Canada Trail but it is not a highway. Trans Canada Trail file.

Kimberley History: The Way it Was

In 1960 there were calls for a highway from Marysville to Crawford Bay

COURTESY OF THE KIMBERLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM ARCHIVES

KIMBERLEY NEWS February 17, 1960

Marysville – Crawford Bay Highway Needed

The need for completion of the road between Marysville and Crawford bay is becoming more demanding each day.

At present there is a road following St. Mary’s river right through to Crawford bay. This follows the power line.

While the highway’s minister is busy spending money in other parts of the province it would do a wealth of good for this and other areas if this road was made available for traffic.

At present only four wheeled drive vehicles dare travel through the cut-off.

Motorists wishing to travel to Nelson or to the coast via Nelson route are forced to travel at least 139 miles to the ferry.

The completion of this road would cut exactly 100 miles off the route.

There is already a good road, which is capable of handling traffic within 15 miles of Kootenay bay.

The completion of the road would open the entire East Kootenay valley making it more accessible to the West Kootenay and the coast.

Even a well graded road would do wonders.

At present traffic is forced to travel over a winding and treacherous lake road for 50 miles around Kootenay Lake.

By opening this cut-off, trucks as well as tourists could travel through a scenic valley without fear of plunging to almost certain death in the lake below.

Kimberley and Marysville would not be the only ones to benefit by the cut-off. Cranbrook, Fernie and the upper valley would also save more than three hours travelling time if and when the road is completed.

Kimberley’s Chamber of Commerce could start the ball rolling by soliciting the help of neighboring chambers in opening this road.

The completion of the road would not hurt a single town or city but in effect would be the greatest thing the government could do for the Kootenays as we have been sadly neglected by the present government in its road building program.