Nash, age 2, playing with the iPads on the newly installed Krayon Kiosk at the Kimberley Public Library (Corey Bullock/Kimberley Bulletin)

Nash, age 2, playing with the iPads on the newly installed Krayon Kiosk at the Kimberley Public Library (Corey Bullock/Kimberley Bulletin)

New iPad kiosk at the Kimberley Public Library

The Friends of the Kimberley Public Library installed a Krayon Kiosk in the Children’s Section of the Kimberley Public Library this past February, and so far, it’s proving to be a hit.

The kiosk is shaped like a crayon, hence the name, and includes 3 iPads and 3 sets of headphones, so children can quietly play games and learn new things. The kiosk is intended for children ages 10 and under.

The Friends of the Kimberley Public Library Board Member, Paula Neidig says the intention of putting the kiosk in is to give kids something else to try, “This new Kiosk was a much needed upgrade from the older iPad station that was very well used and had lived its ‘tech life span’. We wanted to bring in something new, technologically up to date, and increase the learning opportunities for kids with updated applications and a larger selection of educational games.”

The iPads are maintained through remote IT support as well as in house, which keeps these new devices running smoothly.

“As our society continues to embrace technology in new and innovative ways, educators see the need for our youth to be comfortable with devices such as computers and tablets,” says Librarian, Karin von Wittgenstein.

This means that the kiosk can have a positive effect on the growth and development of children as they acquire new skills through play.

“They [the children] are so quick to learn; they’re not afraid,” says Neidig. “They play and learn at the same time.”

According to a study by Margie K Shields and Richard E. Behrman called, The Future of Children, “the public generally agrees that for children to participate socially, economically, and politically in this new and different world, they must acquire a certain level of comfort and competence in using computers.”

“So far there has been really good feedback,” says Neidig.

To visit the kiosk, check out the children’s section of the Kimberley Public Library.