Last Stand: The Vanishing Caribou Rainforest

Last Stand: The Vanishing Caribou Rainforest

Film in Kimberley, November 9; Cranbrook, November 10

In timing with the federal government’s recent report on dwindling caribou herds and habitats, Wildsight is announcing the debut of the film Last Stand: The Vanishing Caribou Rainforest.

The film explores the threatened world of the mountain caribou and their home in the inland temperate rainforest.

It will be shown in Kimberley on Thursday, Nov. 9 and Cranbrook on Friday, Nov. 10, presented by Wildsight and Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative.

“With fewer than 1500 caribou left, struggling for survival in only a small fraction of their range of just a century ago, we don’t have much time left to save the mountain caribou,” said Wildsight. “In the wet old-growth forests that mountain caribou call home, logging, industrial activity and recreation have left tiny caribou herds roaming over a deeply altered landscape that would be nearly unrecognizable to their ancestors. With little old-growth forest left and our changing climate reducing snowpacks that caribou rely on to feed and escape predators, the future for mountain caribou is precarious.”

Wildsight’s Eddie Petryshen says the film looks at our impact on the caribou’s habitat.

“With caribou herds in the Kootenays dwindling and only a dozen or so caribou left in our southern herds, we need to take a hard look at our impact on the unique rainforest ecosystems that they call home – and that’s exactly what this film does.

“Last Stand gives voice to First Nations, scientists, foresters, conservationists, and recreationists trying to chart a new path forward for mountain caribou before it’s too late. The film journeys into the inland rainforest, among thousand year old trees, to explore why the mountain caribou, abundant until not so long ago, are disappearing so quickly—and what we can do to save them.

“Mountain caribou are the canary in the coal mine for our temperate rainforest ecosystem. The choices we make today will decide the fate of this stunning ecosystem for centuries.”

The film, produced by noted wildlife photographer David Moskowitz and Wild Confluence for the Mountain Caribou Initiative, is on a twelve-stop Kootenay tour with Wildsight and Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative this November. It is also being shown across BC, Alberta, the US Pacific Northwest and beyond.

The 35-minute film, starting at 7:30pm on Thursday, November 9th at Centre 64 in Kimberley and on Friday, November 10th at the College of the Rockies Lecture Theatre in Cranbrook, will be followed by a Q&A with conservationists and caribou experts, including Wildsight’s John Bergenske and Dave Quinn and Trevor Kinley, Parks Canada wildlife biologist. Tickets are $10 in advance or $12 at the door. The film trailer and tickets are available at wildsight.ca/laststand.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Bootleg Gap Golf Course has been sold to Simkins Golf Management Inc. for $3 million.
Bootleg Gap Golf Course sold to Simkins Golf Management for $3 million

After the decision was made to sell back in October 2019, Council… Continue reading

Robyn Ostlund wants to get people moving in December and also raise money for the Food Bank. Photo submitted
Fundraiser for Kimberley Food Bank keeps you moving

Last year, Robyn Ostlund of Kimberley organized a fundraiser to assist the… Continue reading

Stock photo courtesy Cliff MacArthur/provincialcourt.bc.ca.
Double-murder trial in case of Cranbrook couple killed adjourned until January

A trial has been adjourned until January for two men charged with… Continue reading

Kimberley RCMP respond to vehicle collision near Wasa.
RCMP attends vehicle that caught fire after colliding with elk near Wasa

The Kimberley RCMP attended the scene of a vehicle that collided with… Continue reading

Hugs and slugs
Second Wave Hugs & Slugs: Stay calm, be kind

Hugs: Huge Hugs for Harriet Pollock for the 35 years of participation… Continue reading

A coal-fired power plant seen through dense smog from the window of an electric bullet train south of Beijing, December 2016. China has continued to increase thermal coal production and power generation, adding to greenhouse gas emissions that are already the world’s largest. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
LNG featured at B.C. energy industry, climate change conference

Hydrogen, nuclear, carbon capture needed for Canada’s net-zero goal

An RCMP officer confers with military rescuers outside their Cormorant helicopter near Bridesville, B.C. Tuesday, Dec. 1. Photo courtesy of RCMP Cpl. Jesse O’Donaghey
Good Samaritan helped Kootenay police nab, rescue suspect which drew armed forces response

Midway RCMP said a Good Samaritan helped track the suspect, then brought the arresting officer dry socks

People line up at a COVID-19 assessment centre during the COVID-19 pandemic in Scarborough, Ont., on Wednesday, December 2, 2020. Toronto and Peel region continue to be in lockdown. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
COVID-19 vaccine approval could be days away as pressures mount on health-care system

Many health officials in regions across the country have reported increasing pressures on hospitals

(Needpix.com)
Pandemic has ‘exacerbated’ concerns for B.C. children and youth with special needs: report

Pandemic worsened an already patchwork system, representative says

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Janet Austin, the lieutenant-governor of British Columbia, not seen, swears in Premier John Horgan during a virtual swearing in ceremony in Victoria, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2020. Horgan says he will look to fill gaps in the federal government’s sick-pay benefits program aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
B.C. premier says province prepared to patch holes in new federal sick-pay benefits

Horgan said workers should not be denied pay when they are preventing COVID-19’s spread

Most Read