Surrey-Panorama MLA Jinny Sims is a former president of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation and NDP MP.

B.C. premier confident Surrey MLA can ‘clear the air’ in RCMP investigation

Jinny Sims said Monday she is not prepared to venture a guess on the nature of the investigation

A B.C. cabinet minister who abruptly resigned last week says she has not been contacted by the RCMP and remains in the dark about the allegations that led to a criminal investigation of her conduct.

Jinny Sims said Monday she is not prepared to venture a guess on the nature of the investigation.

“I don’t know what the allegations are in this instance and it would be inappropriate for me to start speculating,” she said outside the legislature. “I am looking forward to finding out as much as anyone else.”

Sims resigned as citizens’ services minister on Friday as Premier John Horgan announced a special prosecutor had been appointed to help the RCMP in their investigation of her.

“I have to let the process play out and it is a process that will take its time,” she said.

Horgan said he’s also not aware of the allegations facing Sims.

READ MORE: Vancouver lawyer named special prosecutor for investigation into Surrey MLA

“I have every confidence in Jinny,” he told a news conference at the legislature, citing her experience as the head of the B.C. Teachers’ Federation and as an MP. “I’m confident she will be able to clear the air.”

Sims said in a statement Friday that she was “confident” her name would be cleared and dismissed “previous public allegations” that were made against her as having “no credibility.” She did not say what allegations she was referring to.

The Opposition B.C. Liberals have accused Sims of using personal emails to allegedly circumvent the province’s freedom of information laws and of writing letters to support visa applications for 10 Pakistani citizens who were on a security watch list.

It is not known if the allegations about Sims’s personal email or the reference letters are the subject of the RCMP investigation.

Sims has denied any wrongdoing in the use of her emails.

She told the legislature earlier this year that she did not see the final draft of the sponsorship letters, which were sent out with her electronic signature.

“I take responsibility for what happened,” she added. “When I became aware of the issue, I immediately had a serious conversation with the staff to ensure that it would not happen again.”

The RCMP has not commented on its investigation.

The prosecution service said Monday that it appointed a special prosecutor after receiving a formal request from the Mounties on Sept. 30 to consider such an appointment to give legal advice into allegations of criminal wrongdoing against Sims and “other persons unknown” to the service.

In the legislature on Monday, Liberal house leader Mary Polak asked Horgan if the government failed to properly investigate the allegations that were made in March.

“The minister has now resigned and is the subject of an active police investigation in relation to criminal wrongdoing,” said Polak, who added that she also wrote to the RCMP, the Ministry of the Attorney General and the prosecution service. “Will the premier admit he and his government were wrong to have dismissed these allegations in the first place?”

Horgan said an examination of the Liberal allegations were reviewed and produced nothing.

“We did an investigation of some of the other issues that were raised, found no evidence, and at that time advised the Opposition that if they had more to say, they should talk to the RCMP,” he said.

Horgan said he heard nothing further until Friday when Attorney General David Eby told him of the appointment of a special prosecutor.

Dirk Meissner, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

A banner year for building permits in Kimberley

Permits valued at over $27 million at end of September

Farm life: want to take your mind off election results? Let’s talk compost

Go play in the garden, get your hands dirty, and forget the world for a few minutes.

Morrison wins Kootenay-Columbia for Conservative Party

Unofficial results peg 28,495 votes for Morrison with 98 per cent of polls reporting Monday evening

UPDATE: Morrison wins Kootenay-Columbia by more than 7,000 votes

Elections Canada is reporting a 72% voter turnout

Trudeau has won the most seats — but not a majority. What happens next?

Trudeau will have to deal with some of the implications of Monday’s result

Scheer says Canada more divided than ever, as NDP and Bloc hold cards close

While Liberals were shut out of two key prairie provinces, they took two-thirds of the seats in Ontario

Saanich Gulf-Islands’s Elizabeth May coy about leadership plans

The federal Green party leader talks possibility of running as MP without being leader

Estheticians can’t be forced to wax male genitals, B.C. tribunal rules

Langley transgender woman Jessica Yaniv was ordered to pay three salon owners $2,000 each

Two youth arrested in UBC carjacking at gunpoint, after being spotted in stolen Kia

‘A great deal of credit is due the alert person who called us,’ said North Vancouver Sgt. Peter DeVries

People’s Party of Canada’s anti-immigration views ‘didn’t resonate’ with voters: prof

Party was formed on anti-immigration, climate denying views in 2018

Windstorm knocks out power for 10,000 in north and central B.C.

Power slowly being restored, BC Hydro says

Investor alert: ‘Split games’ pyramid scheme circulating in B.C.

British Columbia Securities Commission issues warning about scheme selling virtual shares

Federal NDP may support B.C. with major projects, Carole James says

SkyTrain Surrey extension, Massey Tunnel need Ottawa’s help

‘Issue-by-issue parliament’: Expert says Liberals need to placate NDP to be effective

Scandals, social issues, racism defined 2019 federal election, SFU prof says

Most Read