A CN Railway train derailed near the B.C.-Alberta border on Thursday, Dec. 26, 2019. (Angie Mindus/Williams Lake Tribune)

A CN Railway train derailed near the B.C.-Alberta border on Thursday, Dec. 26, 2019. (Angie Mindus/Williams Lake Tribune)

Cleanup continues after 26 train cars derail near B.C.-Alberta border

The train was carrying potash, according to the B.C. government

Recovery efforts continue at the site of a train derailment east of Mount Robson Provincial Park this week after a Canadian National train derailed.

Photos taken Sunday near Moose Lake showed traffic slowed to single-vehicle alternating on the Yellowhead Highway as crews worked to clean up the derailment area.

According to CN, 26 cars derailed about 30 kilometres east of Mount Robson, not far from the Alberta border, last Thursday.

The B.C. government said one car was fully submerged in the lake and the second was partially underwater. The potash the train was carrying remained largely contained.

READ MORE: Little potash spilled after derailment in B.C. lake: government spokesman


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