The back of BJ’s Restaurant just behind the yet-to-be completed Mark Creek flume rehab. The old concrete flume walls are still standing. The large pipe is the water bypass while work continues in the creek.

The back of BJ’s Restaurant just behind the yet-to-be completed Mark Creek flume rehab. The old concrete flume walls are still standing. The large pipe is the water bypass while work continues in the creek.

Flume rehab behind schedule

Problems with excavation around BJ's Restaurant delay work; it will be done this year, Mayor says

The upstream portion of the flume rehab project — that being from the Wallinger Avenue bridge and past B&B Glass — is proceeding on schedule, according to Don Schacher, Project Coordinator.

However, downstream, past BJ’s Restaurant is experiencing some delays. City CAO Scott Sommerville says that part of the project is about five weeks behind schedule and could experience some cost overruns.

The issue is the fact that BJ’s sits so very close to the creek. The building will be within one metre of the rock work when it’s completed, says Mayor Don McCormick.

“The whole area around BJ’s continues to be a concern,” McCormick said. “The excavation is going to be so close to the foundation of the building, we have to get it right.

“We knew it was going to be difficult. The solarium is off the back of the building. It’s within a metre of the top of the rocks. But at the end of it all, it will be spectacular. Everyone who lives along the flume has had a property upgrade.”

Engineers are working on the problem, but it has caused a setback in the schedule.

“As a result, that portion of the flume is behind by an estimated five weeks” McCormick said. “However, there should be an opportunity to make up time once we have the problem solved.”

Regardless, the project will be finished this year, the Mayor says.

“The contractor doesn’t want to have to come back in the spring, they have other obligations. It will be finished.”

McCormick says it looks like cost overruns will be around two per cent, which would be a contingency expense. However, Council is being kept apprised of progress on a weekly basis.

“Right now we are looking at a two per cent cost overrun. Given the complexity of the project, that’s within reason.”