Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visiting Port Alberni last year. He used a Challenger jet for the trip, so he could join a waiting motorcade for the drive to Tofino, where he joined his family on a private holiday. (Tony Shumuk Photo)

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau visiting Port Alberni last year. He used a Challenger jet for the trip, so he could join a waiting motorcade for the drive to Tofino, where he joined his family on a private holiday. (Tony Shumuk Photo)

Justin Trudeau’s carbon footprint revealed in ranking of world leaders

Travel company ranks 15 world leaders’ foreign flight CO2 emissions

In the midst of presidents and prime ministers talking up their green credentials, a travel company has ranked 15 world leaders according to the size of their 2018 carbon footprint.

Travel company FromAtoB conducted the research, which focuses exclusively on the world leaders’ foreign flight travel. Of the countries contacted, only Australia, Mexico, Indonesia and Switzerland declined to release figures. The King of Saudi Arabia had zero flight carbon emissions but that was because he stayed home last year between Oct. 2017 and Feb. 2019.

ALSO READ: Youth activism pushes Central Saanich to declare ‘climate emergency

US President Donald Trump used the dirtiest plane, a Boeing 747-200B, which emitted the most CO2 gas – 0.09 tonnes per square kilometre. He also came in second place, flying 81,400 miles (131,000 km), which emitted nearly 11,550 tonnes of CO2 gas into the atmosphere. Trump made 16 international trips, with the longest being to Singapore for the North Korea summit, last June.

The biggest polluter was Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzō Abe, who had the highest emissions of any G20 leader. In mitigation, as an island nation Abe often needed to fly to get to and from Japan. His flights covered the biggest distance and burnt the most fuel. Over the course of the year, he flew internationally 38 times in his Boeing 747-400, travelling 128,000 miles (207,000 km), which emitted nearly 14,500 tonnes of CO2 gas.

ALSO READ: Slaying dragons: getting inside the minds of climate change skeptics

Despite Trudeau’s green cred taking something of a battering recently due to his government’s support of the Trans Mountain Pipeline, he scored favourably in the rankings, coming 11th out of 15. Compared to Trump’s travel emitting 88 kg of CO2 per km, Trudeau’s only emitted 20 kg. He travelled a total of 103,990 miles (167,355 km) and was responsible for 3308.7 tonnes of CO2 emissions.

European leaders were kept busy by the various crises gripping the continent, with shuttle diplomacy seeing Angela Merkel of Germany take 83 flights, Emmanuel Macron of France 77 and Theresa May of the U.K. 51.

The rankings of biggest carbon footprint to least are:

1. Shinzō Abe (Japan)

2. Donald Trump (USA)

3. Moon Jae-in (South Korea)

4. Xi Jinping (China)

5. Emmanuel Macron (France)

6. Vladimir Putin (Russia)

7. Narendra Modi (India)

8. Angela Merkel (Germany)

9. Giuseppe Conte (Italy)

10. Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Turkey)

11. Justin Tudeau (Canada)

12. Theresa May (U.K.)

13. Michel Temer (Brazil)

14. Mark Rutte (Netherlands)

15. Mariano Rajoy/Pedro Sanchez (Spain)

ALSO READ: Scientists warn warmer and more acidic oceans threaten marine life

FromAtoB say their analysis covers all official state travel across national borders but does not include domestic flights. CO2 emissions are based on the average values for the types of aircraft, as specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization.

FromAtoB is an online travel booking and comparison website. For the full report visit their website at fromatob.com.



nick.murray@peninsulanewsreview.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Environment

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Jim Webster displays one of the 50 ski chairs he recently purchased from the Resorts of the Canadian Rockies (RCR). After around 50 years of use at the Kimberley Alpine Resort, Webster is now selling the chairs for $500 each to raise funds for a local parks project. Paul Rodgers photo.
Jim Webster sells vintage Kimberley Alpine Resort ski chairs for park fundraiser

Marysville resident Jim Webster recently came into possession of some Kimberley history;… Continue reading

(stock photo)
Josh Dueck named Team Canada chef de mission for 2022 Beijing Paralympics

An acclaimed Paralympic champion with local roots has been named to a… Continue reading

A woman wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 uses walking sticks while walking up a hill, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, November 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Interior Health reports 83 more COVID-19 infections overnight

46 cases are now associated with a COVID-19 community cluster in Revelstoke

The Kimberley Nordic Club has outlined their plans for a safe season of winter sport amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo courtesy of Kimberley Nordic Centre.
Kimberley Nordic Club details plans for safe season of winter sport

The Kimberley Nordic Club has released their plan to re-open for the… Continue reading

A man wearing a face mask to prevent the spread of COVID-19 walks past a mural in Vancouver on Monday, Nov. 30, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
212 new COVID-19 cases in Interior Health over the weekend

A total of 490 cases remain active; 15 in hospital

A tongue-in-cheek message about wearing a face mask to curb the spread of COVID-19 on a sign outside a church near Royal Columbia Hospital, in New Westminster, B.C., on Sunday, Nov. 29, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C.’s COVID-19 infection count climbs back up to 656

20 more people in hospital, active cases still rising

A logo for Netflix on a remote control is seen in Portland, Ore.,Aug. 13, 2020. Experts in taxation and media say a plan announced Monday by the government will ultimately add to the cost of digital services and goods sold by foreign companies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Jenny Kane
‘Netflix tax’ for digital media likely to raise prices for consumers, experts say

The government says Canadian companies already collect those taxes when they make digital sales

BIG SALMON ranch in Washington State. (Center for Whale Research handout)
Non-profit buys Chinook ranch in hopes of increasing feed for southern resident killer whales

The ranch, which borders both sides of Washington State’s Elwha River, is a hotspot for chinook salmon

Gaming content was big on YouTube in 2020. (Black Press Media files)
What did Canadians watch on Youtube during isolation? Workouts, bird feeders

Whether it was getting fit or ‘speaking moistly,’ Canadians had time to spare this year

(Needpix.com)
Fraudsters projected to use pet scams to gouge over $3M from customers: BBB

The pandemic heavily contributed to the number of puppy scams

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

A teacher places the finishing touches on the welcome sign at Hunter’s Glen Junior Public School which is part of the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) during the COVID-19 pandemic in Scarborough, Ont., on Sept. 14, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Hindsight 2020: How do you preserve a year many Canadians would rather forget?

Figuring out how to preserve the story of the pandemic poses a series of challenges

Haley Callison. (Facebook photo)
Former B.C. pro hockey player frustrated with COVID-deniers after horrific bout with virus

Haleigh Callison hopes people will follow precautions and tone down the rhetoric

A man stands in the window of an upper floor condo in Vancouver on March 24, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Change made to insurance for B.C. condo owners amid rising premiums

Council CEO Janet Sinclair says the change will mean less price volatility

Most Read