Ryan Mckenzie file.

Ryan Mckenzie file.

New 3 year agreement ratified by USW members at Kimberley Alpine Resort

They were able to negotiate a 7.25 per cent wage increase over three years for members on the hill

For The Bulletin

Members of USW Local 1-405 at the Kimberley Alpine Resort have a new three year collective agreement that will run through until the fall of 2022.

Workers at Kimberley Alpine Resort (KAR) ratified their agreement by an overwhelming amount, voting throughout the day on December 21, 2019 at the resort as the operation began a new ski season.

Some bargaining highlights included supervisory language enhancements, employee equipment funding increases, specific job classification improvements and a very fair wage increase.

“We were able to negotiate a 7.25 per cent wage increase over three years for members on the hill,” said Grant Farquhar, lead negotiator for USW Local 1-405. “We also improved the health and wellness plan which aids in covering the health costs for the members that are not covered by the benefit plan.”

This round of negotiations was very productive and provided a sense of cooperation between the union and management, said Farquhar. Both Ted Funston, KAR General Manager and Farquhar wanted to share, “the process of bargaining this year was a very positive and a collaborative effort.”

“We were also fortunate that Mother Nature came to help at the resort just in time for the ski season to kick off, with an unprecedented snowfall this past week,” Farquhar said in a press release, adding that the members at the resort were busy trying to handle the large accumulation and continue to work tirelessly to ensure a great and safe season at KAR.

“I want to thank both bargaining committees for their tireless work throughout this process – most of the hours they spent negotiating were unpaid and during the off-season,” he said.

The United Steelworkers Local 1-405 is a diverse union representing over 1300 workers in Sawmills, Credit Unions, Insurance Services, Hotels, Ski Resorts and Municipal workers in the East and West Kootenays.

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