Two bucks go at it in Townsite last week

Two bucks go at it in Townsite last week

Use caution as rut begins

In the weeks leading up to the rut (into November and December) bucks increase their displays of dominance and indirect threats.

  • Oct. 21, 2013 9:00 a.m.

CAROLYN GRANT/Daily Bulletin

As the fall advances into November, bucks of both the mule and white-tail variety will begin to enter the rut, and residents of Cranbrook and Kimberley should exercise caution around such displays.

In the weeks leading up to the rut (into November and December) bucks increase their displays of dominance and indirect threats.

A dominant buck typically circles a rival with deliberate steps; back arched, head low and tail flicking.

Bucks can also display dominance by violently thrashing the bushes with their antlers.

Bucks will engage each other in a show of dominance, and while it can be fascinating to watch, the message from the Kimberley Urban Deer Committee is, do it from a distance.

“The general message is, stay away from bucks,” says Kimberley Urban Deer Committee Chair Gary Glinz. “They are wild, you never know if they will take a run at you. Leave a wide berth when you see a buck following a doe.”

Glinz says that as bucks enter the rut, their hormones are raging and they are far more focused on breeding than anything else. Staying away from them is just common sense.

Often, Glinz says, larger bucks will enter town during the rut after staying away for most of the year. These bucks will leave again after the rut, and you can ensure that they stay away be managing attractants.

A particular attractant right now are mountain ash berries, something people may overlook when making sure apples and plums are picked.

Bucks are burning energy during the rut and need to replenish it, with mountain ash berries being a good source.

To report an incident to the Conservation Officer Service, please call 1-877-952-7277.