Expect lots of changes to Vancouver Whitecaps next season: head coach

The Whitecaps lost to Seattle last week

Expect lots of changes to Vancouver Whitecaps next season: head coach

Carl Robinson demonstrated with some of his late-season manoeuvres that emotion doesn’t play into his decisions with the Vancouver Whitecaps.

The head coach made it clear once again Tuesday at his media availability following the club’s playoff defeat to the Seattle Sounders.

“Lots,” Robinson said when asked how much change he expects to his roster over the winter. ”The league is becoming better and better.

“The standard of player is getting better, so we have to evolve.”

VIDEO: Whitecaps season comes to end with 2-0 loss to Sounders

Picked by many to finish at or near the bottom of the standings after a miserable 2016 campaign, the Whitecaps made it to the semifinals of the CONCACAF Champions League and sat atop Major League Soccer’s Western Conference in the final few weeks of the season.

Vancouver wound up third thanks to a late stumble, but picked up its first-ever post-season victory in the knockout round before losing out in the conference semis.

“When everyone writes you off … you use that as motivation,” said Robinson, whose Whitecaps made a 13-point jump in the table. ”Then you get there and you’re always a little bit disappointed when your season ends.

“You always want more.”

The Welshman pointed to a number of players entering their prime as keys to the club’s success moving forward, including midfielders Yordy Reyna, Cristian Techera and Aly Ghazal, defenders Kendall Waston, Tim Parker and Jake Nerwinski, as well as goalkeeper Stefan Marinovic.

“We will continue to build our young group,” said Robinson, who also referenced teenage sensation Alphonso Davies. ”We will continue to get better players in than we have, and unfortunately that means there’s turnover.”

One player definitely on the way out is veteran ‘keeper David Ousted, who confirmed Monday he won’t be back.

The 32-year-old Dane said he was told in June by the club it wouldn’t be picking up the option on his contract after Ousted declined to take a pay cut.

His fate was further sealed when the 26-year-old Marinovic signed with Vancouver in July and eventually overtook Ousted in the pecking order.

“I’m disappointed, especially with the last couple of months,” said Ousted, who joined the club in 2013. ”It’s the business part of this game.”

A member of the Whitecaps since its 2011 expansion campaign, the status of defender Jordan Harvey is also up in the air with his contract set to run out.

The 33-year-old started 28 games in MLS, but like Ousted found himself on the bench by the end of the season.

“We’ll see what happens,” said Harvey. “I’m really proud to have been a staple and help this city and this club grow.”

Brought in on loan this season, star striker Fredy Montero said it’s likely he will be go back to his club in China as of right now, but remained open to a return to Vancouver if a permanent deal can be worked out.

“We had ups and downs, but I enjoyed my days,” said Montero, who scored 14 times for Vancouver. ”I showed the consistency that’s always been attached with my name.”

The question of money and how much the Whitecaps are willing to spend on players is an almost constant talking point among supporters. Vancouver’s payroll is in the top-10, but remains behind the league’s big boys.

Montero was the highest-paid player in club history at US$1.8 million, but with no guarantee he’ll be back, questions remain what level ownership is willing to invest after falling in the conference semifinals for the second time in three years.

“If you talk to any person in any job, they always want more money,” said Robinson. ”Better players obviously cost more money, but we’ve got a really talented group here.

“We’ve found some really good hidden gems.”

The Whitecaps relied heavily on goals off set pieces and counter attacks this season, often soaking up pressure and allowing opponents to possess the ball for long stretches.

The formula worked a lot of the time, but Robinson came under heavy criticism in the playoff series with Seattle when he deployed a conservative lineup in a scoreless first leg at home.

Techera and Reyna were both hurt for that one, and would start the second leg, but Vancouver registered just one shot on target in over 180 combined minutes in bowing out to the rival Sounders.

“As a coach of any sports team you’re open to criticism,” said Robinson. ”I’m not here to make any excuses. In the last two games against Seattle we didn’t perform very well.”

While there will be a number of changes on the field, Robinson’s job is safe off it, with Whitecaps president Bob Lenarduzzi laughing off a question about the head coach’s future.

“Why wouldn’t he be back?” said an incredulous Lenarduzzi. “There’s no doubt about Carl Robinson. He will be back, and there’s never been any thought that he wouldn’t be.”

—-

Follow @JClipperton_CP on Twitter

Joshua Clipperton, The Canadian Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

RDEK reminds public to register for their emergency notification system. File photo.
RDEK reminds residents to register for East Kootenay Evacuation Notification System

Provincial Alert system cannot be used for local emergencies

RCR’s snow making is one of the bulk water users in Kimberley. Matt Mosteller file
Kimberley bulk water rates to rise 20 per cent if bylaw adopted

Bylaw given first three readings this week

COVID-19. (Image courtesy CDC)
Interior Health reports 70 new cases overnight

The total number of cases in the region is now at 1,426

David Moskowitz file
Wildsight to present webinar on Inland Temperate Rainforest

Join Wildsight next Tuesday, December 1, 2020 for a free webinar on… Continue reading

Carmen Hintz (right) donates $500 to Heather Smith (left) at the Kimberley Food Bank, leftover cash after fundraising to rescue four kittens. Paul Rodgers photo.
Local’s extra kitten fundraiser money donated to Kimberley Food Bank

Carmen Hintz donates $500, after raising money to support rescued cats

A man wearing a face mask to help curb the spread of COVID-19 walks in downtown Vancouver, B.C., Sunday, Nov. 22, 2020. The use of masks is mandatory in indoor public and retail spaces in the province. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. records deadliest day of pandemic with 13 deaths, 738 new COVID-19 cases

Number of people in hospital is nearing 300, while total cases near 30,000

FILE – A paramedic holds a test tube containing a blood sample during an antibody testing program at the Hollymore Ambulance Hub, in Birmingham, England, on Friday, June 5, 2020. (Simon Dawson/Pool via AP)
Want to know if you’ve had COVID-19? LifeLabs is offering an antibody test

Test costs $75 and is available in B.C. and Ontario

The grey region of this chart shows the growth of untraced infection, due to lack of information on potential sources. With added staff and reorganization, the gap is stabilized, Dr. Bonnie Henry says. (B.C. Centre for Disease Control)
B.C. adjusts COVID-19 tracing to keep up with surging cases

People now notified of test results by text message

People wear face masks as they pose next to a Christmas display in Montreal, Sunday, November 22, 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
How to tell family their Christmas gathering is too risky and you’re not going

Dr. Hurst says it’s best to frame the conversation from a place of care, stressing safety precautions.

Keanu Reeves in “The Matrix.”
Free ‘Hollywood Suite’ movies in December include ‘Keanussance’ titles starring Keanu Reeves

Also featured is the Israeli-made ‘Valley of Tears,’ a 10-part war drama

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good
Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

FILE - This May 4, 2020, file photo provided by the University of Maryland School of Medicine, shows the first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore.  Pfizer announced Wednesday, Nov. 18, 2020, more results in its ongoing coronavirus vaccine study that suggest the shots are 95% effective a month after the first dose. (Courtesy of University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP, File)
VIDEO: B.C. planning for the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines in the first weeks of 2021

The question of who will get the vaccine first relies on Canada’s ethical framework

This undated photo issued by the University of Oxford shows of vial of coronavirus vaccine developed by AstraZeneca and Oxford University, in Oxford, England. (University of Oxford/John Cairns via AP)
Canada can make vaccines, just not the ones leading the COVID-19 race

Canada has spent more than $1 billion to pre-order seven different developing COVID-19 vaccines

Most Read